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Stuck at Home: A PSC Library Newsletter

Stuck at Home: A PSC Library Newsletter


September

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What's Newsworthy

Due to COVID-19, most PSC Library services are now virtual and available Monday-Thursday 8am-8pm and Friday 8am-4:30pm. Our COVID-19 guide has more information. If you have a question, please email us at librarians@prairiestate.edu or use the "Chat Now" button.

HOW-TO EMBED CONTENT INTO D2L

Did you know that you can embed library content into D2L so students can watch videos at any time, and several times over? For example, your students can hear the speeches of Abraham Lincoln after you embed them in D2L. Or you can share a clip from Shakespeare’s Othello. To teach you how to do this, we have tutorials on how to embed OneSearch and Alexander Street Press content available so that your students have everything in one place.

WE HAVE A NEW DATABASE!

Whether you need to link to a movie for your students or something for (another) Friday night at home, try our new database, Feature Films for Education.

“The Feature Films for Education Collection offers hundreds of full-length feature films. It focuses on current and hard-to-find titles, including dramas, literary adaptations, blockbusters, classics, science fiction, environmental titles, foreign films, social issues, animation studies, Academy Award winners, and more.”

“The Feature Films for Education Collection offers hundreds of full-length feature films. It focuses on current and hard-to-find titles, including dramas, literary adaptations, blockbusters, classics, science fiction, environmental titles, foreign films, social issues, animation studies, Academy Award winners, and more.”

30 SECONDS TO A MORE INFORMATION LITERATE STUDENT

ACRL (The Association of College and Research Libraries) has created six frames for understanding information literacy in higher education. This month we feature the frame, “Authority Is Constructed and Contextual.” In this framework we recognize that experts vary according to their environment.

This frame divides authorities into three categories: subject specific authorities, authorities with influence, and authorities due to life experience. Some authorities are subject authorities like Stephen Hawking in the field of theoretical physics. Others have societal influence, like Kylie Jenner. Lastly, others have lived experience, like Elie Wiesel.

Learners who are cutting their teeth on this concept understand how they can look at resources and determine whether or not the author is credible and what credentials they have. They will recognize that all groups have authorities and different environments will produce different types of authorities. They will understand how these authorities exchange information. Once they understand this, they can also question both the authority and the environment. They will also be able to find their own authoritative voice.

With this knowledge, learners can hold two (or more!) opposing views at once. They can confidently find authoritative sources for courses and will understand the value of approaching things with a skeptical eye. They will also start to question the ways that authority was traditionally granted and will recognize the need to continually question their personally held beliefs.

Staff Interview with Annie Werner

Our Reference Librarian, Annie Werner has accepted a new position. While she won’t be going anywhere soon, we wanted to chat with her about it and her time at PSC.

Me: Tell me about what you’ll be doing.

Annie: I just accepted a RN position at Misericordia Home in Chicago. Misericordia is a residential community for persons with mild to profound intellectual and developmental disabilities.Photo of Annie Werner in scrubs

Me: What is your favorite thing about PSC?

Annie: My favorite thing about PSC is the students. I learn so much from each person's uniqueness and their willingness to share.

Me: What do you remember fondly?

Annie: I enjoy my interactions with students [and community members]. Working the traditional reference desk late afternoon into the evening expands the role of the librarian. For instance, I have students ask me to listen to their speech before they present to the class or I might read a picture book to a toddler sitting on their mother's lap while she writes a paper. I get to know the students, their classes, and enjoy the reports back about how that test or paper or presentation went.

Me: What advice do you have for PSC students in general?

Annie: I am in awe of students' perseverance and encourage you to keep it up. You keep me going! So many of you are balancing many other obligations outside of school. I think it is important for those who support you to recognize this.

When I felt overwhelmed, my mom asked me, "how do you eat an elephant?" The answer is "one-bite-at-a-time." I encourage anyone to tackle a seemingly insurmountable task--whether it is a research paper, the semester, or making tonight's dinner--in this manner. Dividing the task into bite-size pieces usually seems more doable than looking at the task as a whole. I encourage you to ask questions--of your professors, of the librarians, of your classmates, friends, and families. There are so many around you to support you on this journey!

Me: What advice do you have during this time specifically?

Annie: Recent events hurt my heart. I wish I had a magic elixir to heal the wounds. The poet and scholar, Rumi is attributed with the following, "Yesterday I was so clever I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise so I am changing myself." In order to bring about the change, I think we need to keep reading, keep conversing, and keep educating ourselves and those around us. It is an enormous task, and one that requires a one-bite-at-a-time approach.

Our new educational environment is encouraging each of us to grow in ways we may not have previously considered. Think about all the new technology we've attempted! For instance, I made my first YouTube video with study tips for finals! I do miss seeing the students' faces. Virtual reference can be a little lonely at times.

Me: Anything else?

Annie: As I am not leaving PSC at this time, I do not have parting words as such, but I will say, please keep your curiosity! Nurture it with experiences, learning, reading, and love. And, the PSC library is a wonderful place to fill up, even, virtually. Through OneSearch and Overdrive you have access to many newspapers, magazines, academic journals, textbooks, and eBooks. Contact us through email at librarians@prairiestate.edu or via chat and ask. We are happy to help, whether it is with a question about D2L, research for a speech, or directing you to a good book to read!

NEW FEATURED EBOOKS

There’s no need to go to campus when you can read our vast collection of eBooks via Overdrive and OneSearch. Our new eBooks include:

Cover: The Scientific Method: An Evolution of Thinking from Darwin to Dewey

The Scientific Method

Henry M. Cowles

Cover: Writers & Lovers

Writers & Lovers

Lily King

Cover: American Tacos: A History and Guide

American Tacos: A History and Guide

José R. Ralat

Cover: Harrow the Ninth

Harrow the Ninth

Tamsyn Muir

Cover: The Angel of the Crows

The Angel of the Crows

Katherine Addison

Cover: More Myself: A Journey

More Myself: A Journey

Alicia Keys

Cover: American Dirt

American Dirt

Jeanine Cummins

Cover: The World According to Physics

The World According to Physics

Jim Al-Khalili

Cover: The Evolution of Knowledge: Rethinking Science for the Anthropocene

The Evolution of Knowledge: Rethinking Science for the Anthropocene

Jürgen Renn

Cover: Nature's Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Yard

Nature's Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Yard

Douglas W. Tallamy